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terrypjohnson
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I did my first "Power Hour" of the year. I was blocking a 3-5 stack using GDB rules (or more accurately, Coach Cox's IOL/Wash blocking). Simply put, my line isn't quick enough to get to the linebackers. I didn't see this type of speed discrepancy at 8U, but it 12U it's very noticeable. We ended up averaging about three yards per play with Sam and Mike making a lot of the tackles.

I feel like I need to switch up the blocking rules a bit. Would GOD blocking help solve it? The middle school coach suggested something like Post - Down - Backer, but I'm worried that I'll run into the same problem. Since I'm not 100% of the right way to proceed, I thought I would ask some people smarter than me so that I can start teaching it Tuesday.

Fight 'em until Hell freezes over, then fight 'em on the ice -- Dutch Meyer


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Coach Kyle
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Posted by: @terrypjohnson

I did my first "Power Hour" of the year. I was blocking a 3-5 stack using GDB rules (or more accurately, Coach Cox's IOL/Wash blocking). Simply put, my line isn't quick enough to get to the linebackers. I didn't see this type of speed discrepancy at 8U, but it 12U it's very noticeable. We ended up averaging about three yards per play with Sam and Mike making a lot of the tackles.

I feel like I need to switch up the blocking rules a bit. Would GOD blocking help solve it? The middle school coach suggested something like Post - Down - Backer, but I'm worried that I'll run into the same problem. Since I'm not 100% of the right way to proceed, I thought I would ask some people smarter than me so that I can start teaching it Tuesday.

How is a speed discrepancy an issue? That makes no sense. Your lineman know where the play is going, and they know where the linebackers are going to go. Lineman in college and NFL can block linebackers.

Deaths while walking 4,743Deaths from football 12


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terrypjohnson
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@coach-kyle It makes complete sense to me -- there's a big difference in the level of athleticism at this age group (12U) and the one I was coaching previously (8U) -- especially in rec ball. I feel like there's a big mismatch between my OT's and LB's, so I'm asking if anyone has any ideas to flip the odds in my favor. More specifically, would GOD blocking -- with two double teams playside be a better choice.

Fight 'em until Hell freezes over, then fight 'em on the ice -- Dutch Meyer


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CoachDP
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I don't use an o-line vs. LB blocking rule because it's a designed mismatch.  I can't try to help you in something that I would never do myself.

--Dave

"The Greater the Teacher, the More Powerful the Player."

The Mission Statement: "I want to show any young man that he is far tougher than he thinks, that he can accomplish more than what he dreamed and that his work ethic will take him wherever he wants to go."

#BattleReady newhope


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terrypjohnson
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@coachdp - If it's alright, I'd like to reach out to you this weekend / Monday. I remember you saying you blocked power a couple of different ways. I'd like to learn how you do it, so I can teach my kids how to do it.

Fight 'em until Hell freezes over, then fight 'em on the ice -- Dutch Meyer


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Bob Goodman
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Posted by: @coach-kyle
Posted by: @terrypjohnson

I did my first "Power Hour" of the year. I was blocking a 3-5 stack using GDB rules (or more accurately, Coach Cox's IOL/Wash blocking). Simply put, my line isn't quick enough to get to the linebackers. I didn't see this type of speed discrepancy at 8U, but it 12U it's very noticeable. We ended up averaging about three yards per play with Sam and Mike making a lot of the tackles.

I feel like I need to switch up the blocking rules a bit. Would GOD blocking help solve it? The middle school coach suggested something like Post - Down - Backer, but I'm worried that I'll run into the same problem. Since I'm not 100% of the right way to proceed, I thought I would ask some people smarter than me so that I can start teaching it Tuesday.

How is a speed discrepancy an issue? That makes no sense. Your lineman know where the play is going, and they know where the linebackers are going to go. 

But it's still hard if they have to meet them in a lot of empty space.  This is why it's easier to have the downfield blockers lead and the runner follow than to assign the blockers to block individual defenders.  Making the LB come to the blocker is easier than having the blocker chase the LB or even cut off the LB.

Still there are plays where this strategy is infeasible.  Any play where you have OL far from the POA release to 2nd level, they'd have too far to go for the ballcarrier to get on their tail, unless the play is already a big gainer at that moment.  I just look at the "B" of "GDB" far off the hole as a low priority, low percentage assignment that's only there because you don't want a potential blocker to just take the play off -- unless you're more afraid of getting a block in the back call than you think the chance of a positive contribution to the play is.  There are coaches who say that!  I just think that's bad psychology, though, as when we were practicing a week ago and Joey was an end on the back side of the play and his father, Coach Dennis, got on him for taking the play off.  Next 2 plays he drove a DL downfield 10 yards!

Anyway, I just accept the cutoff block by an OL releasing far from the hole to be a bonus -- great if we can get it, but I wouldn't count on it.

Best is if you can incorporate enough misdirection into the play to catch that LB flat footed.

This post was modified 3 weeks ago 2 times by Bob Goodman

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CoachDP
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Posted by: @terrypjohnson

@coachdp - If it's alright, I'd like to reach out to you this weekend / Monday. 

Give me a call.

--Dave

"The Greater the Teacher, the More Powerful the Player."

The Mission Statement: "I want to show any young man that he is far tougher than he thinks, that he can accomplish more than what he dreamed and that his work ethic will take him wherever he wants to go."

#BattleReady newhope


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CoachDP
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Posted by: @bob-goodman

Making the LB come to the blocker is easier than having the blocker chase the LB or even cut off the LB.

^ This.

--Dave

"The Greater the Teacher, the More Powerful the Player."

The Mission Statement: "I want to show any young man that he is far tougher than he thinks, that he can accomplish more than what he dreamed and that his work ethic will take him wherever he wants to go."

#BattleReady newhope


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Coach Kyle
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Maybe you guys have never been a linebacker who got destroyed by a lineman blocking a linebacker lol 😆 

Deaths while walking 4,743Deaths from football 12


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Coach Kyle
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Posted by: @bob-goodman

But it's still hard if they have to meet them in a lot of empty space. 

Why? Same logic applies to the lineman as it does to the lead backer. You know where the linebacker is going. If block someone to the back of the play rather than the front of the play the line backer probably isn't even looking for you. And you know which direction he should be going. So just aim a little bit in that direction and blow up his outside shoulder.

Making the LB come to the blocker is easier than having the blocker chase the LB or even cut off the LB.

I don't know what you mean when you say that you're making the linebacker come to the blocker.

Any play where you have OL far from the POA release to 2nd level, they'd have too far to go for the ballcarrier to get on their tail, unless the play is already a big gainer at that moment.

Why are we talking about a lineman far from the POA? What about the lineman near the POA?

  I just look at the "B" of "GDB" far off the hole as a low priority, low percentage assignment that's only there because you don't want a potential blocker to just take the play off -- unless you're more afraid of getting a block in the back call than you think the chance of a positive contribution to the play is.  There are coaches who say that!  I just think that's bad psychology, though, as when we were practicing a week ago and Joey was an end on the back side of the play and his father, Coach Dennis, got on him for taking the play off.  Next 2 plays he drove a DL downfield 10 yards!

Anyway, I just accept the cutoff block by an OL releasing far from the hole to be a bonus -- great if we can get it, but I wouldn't count on it.

Best is if you can incorporate enough misdirection into the play to catch that LB flat footed.

If you're trying to ask a backside lineman release down field and get a block at the POA, then sure, that's extremely unlikely. If you're trying to ask a playside lineman who doesn't have someone in their gap to go to linebacker on the backside (like an extended down block), that's stupid simple and a great blocking scheme.

You're not always going to get great plays out of that block, but you also don't have to. You actually get some value simply out of the lineman moving his butt out of the way. There is now a gaping hole where he left. And if he even causes the linebacker to pause, it's better than nothing, especially when we're talking about a stud. 

Deaths while walking 4,743Deaths from football 12


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CoachDP
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Posted by: @coach-kyle There is now a gaping hole where he left. 

I don't want a gaping hole in my offensive line.  A gaping hole can sink a ship, or allow defensive players onto my side of the LOS.

--Dave

"The Greater the Teacher, the More Powerful the Player."

The Mission Statement: "I want to show any young man that he is far tougher than he thinks, that he can accomplish more than what he dreamed and that his work ethic will take him wherever he wants to go."

#BattleReady newhope


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Coach Kyle
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@coachdp 

I've definitely had a running back hit a hole they weren't supposed to hit while running this scheme and score. Those holes wouldn't have been there if we were looking for double teams.

Deaths while walking 4,743Deaths from football 12


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CoachDP
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But we don't teach our ball-carriers to "hit the hole" or "run to daylight."  Like Wedge, they're taught to get inside the wall ("run to darkness").  If you're running to daylight, you're not running to where your blockers are.

--Dave

"The Greater the Teacher, the More Powerful the Player."

The Mission Statement: "I want to show any young man that he is far tougher than he thinks, that he can accomplish more than what he dreamed and that his work ethic will take him wherever he wants to go."

#BattleReady newhope


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Bob Goodman
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Posted by: @coach-kyle
Posted by: @bob-goodman

But it's still hard if they have to meet them in a lot of empty space. 

Why? Same logic applies to the lineman as it does to the lead backer. You know where the linebacker is going. If block someone to the back of the play rather than the front of the play the line backer probably isn't even looking for you. And you know which direction he should be going. So just aim a little bit in that direction and blow up his outside shoulder.

No, you don't necessarily know even that.  As a blocker your back is to the ballcarrier, and the ballcarrier is moving.  You have a job similar to that of the linebacker in stopping a moving target, but you don't get to use your hands to tackle the linebacker the way the linebacker can with the ballcarrier.  Nowadays you can't even block him below the waist, while the LB can still tackle the ballcarrier below the waist.

Making the LB come to the blocker is easier than having the blocker chase the LB or even cut off the LB.

I don't know what you mean when you say that you're making the linebacker come to the blocker.

 

If you don't try to track the LB, but instead have the ballcarrier assume a close relationship to you, then the LB has to go thru you to get to him.

Any play where you have OL far from the POA release to 2nd level, they'd have too far to go for the ballcarrier to get on their tail, unless the play is already a big gainer at that moment.

Why are we talking about a lineman far from the POA? What about the lineman near the POA?

 The OL near the POA has the advantage of being close to the ballcarrier. The OL far from the POA can't easily get the ballcarrier to follow him closely, and has to execute a cutoff block, which is hard to do in space.

 

This post was modified 3 weeks ago by Bob Goodman

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J. Potter (seabass)
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Terry- what formation/formations are you running power out of? That will make a difference in the feedback you get. 


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