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Trouble getting to the Linebackers

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J. Potter (seabass)
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Posted by: @coachdp
Posted by: @bob-goodman

Making the LB come to the blocker is easier than having the blocker chase the LB or even cut off the LB.

^ This.

--Dave

That’s precisely what I was trying to get our kid’s to realize last week. It’s not so much that we’re making the LB come to us, it’s his job to come to us and all we have to do is meet him at the junction. For us it’s all about our tracks or angles. If we take the right angle he’s going to run into us. 


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J. Potter (seabass)
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I’m assuming you are running B gap power?


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terrypjohnson
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@seabass - To answer your questions:

1) We were running both Double Wing and Fat Formation. Shoe-to-shoe splits.

2) The play was a "C" Gap Power.

Fight 'em until Hell freezes over, then fight 'em on the ice -- Dutch Meyer


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Coach Kyle
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Posted by: @bob-goodman

 

As a blocker your back is to the ballcarrier, and the ballcarrier is moving. 

 

but instead have the ballcarrier assume a close relationship to you, then the LB has to go thru you to get to him.

 

 

Why is it that the lineman is clueless as to where the running back is going, but the lead blocker knows he's right behind him?

Deaths while walking 4,743Deaths from football 12


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CoachDP
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Posted by: @seabass

If we take the right angle he’s going to run into us. 

^ This.

--Dave

"The Greater the Teacher, the More Powerful the Player."

The Mission Statement: "I want to show any young man that he is far tougher than he thinks, that he can accomplish more than what he dreamed and that his work ethic will take him wherever he wants to go."

#BattleReady newhope


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J. Potter (seabass)
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@terrypjohnson 

I have never run that offense…only defended it. You guys are essentially swinging a wall of blocker’s like a gate on power?

Seems like the angles of departure are the key…maybe more important than who they are supposed to block. The PSG’s angle will be steeper than the C and the PST’s angle will be steeper than the PSG’s. I’m assuming you have them foot to foot so they move together….


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Bob Goodman
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Posted by: @coach-kyle
Posted by: @bob-goodman

 

As a blocker your back is to the ballcarrier, and the ballcarrier is moving. 

 

but instead have the ballcarrier assume a close relationship to you, then the LB has to go thru you to get to him. 

Why is it that the lineman is clueless as to where the running back is going, but the lead blocker knows he's right behind him?

Because it's the runner's responsibility to get on his tail.  In fact I've been drawing up a play this weekend where that's the instruction.


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terrypjohnson
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After talking with Coach Potter (thank you again, sir!) here's what we did tonight with much better results!

1. We went under center. We lined up in a pre-shifted Double Wing (offset FB, Wing at pitch depth... when QB lifted his leg the playside wing kept jumping, so we pre-shifted so we could get a look). 

2. We used the video game approach to teach SAB, where we started at the end and worked backwards. This clicked with one of our assistants, who then asked to work with the offensive line. He got them so fired up that I turned things over to him and coached the backs.

3. We used the QB as a blocker -- this makes it feel more Single Wing-like to me. I instructed him to tell me if there's no one for him to hit. We ran Toss Spin for a big gain on the next play. A great way to conclude practice!

4. We went "tackle over" with a Nasty split a few times. We had the end block out and the FB and Wing lead. This worked really well.

While we still have a lot of work to do, I'm really pleased with the progress. 

Thank you for all of your help guys!!

Fight 'em until Hell freezes over, then fight 'em on the ice -- Dutch Meyer


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CoachDP
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Posted by: @terrypjohnson

After talking with Coach Potter (thank you again, sir!) here's what we did tonight with much better results!

Glad to hear it, TPJ.  You always ask good questions, so it makes for simple and straightforward answers.

The main thing is, you're looking for real answers for scheme; not "Gimme a play" or "Gimme a drill."  When you have real answers for scheme, it makes everything (install, diagnosis) so much easier.

--Dave

"The Greater the Teacher, the More Powerful the Player."

The Mission Statement: "I want to show any young man that he is far tougher than he thinks, that he can accomplish more than what he dreamed and that his work ethic will take him wherever he wants to go."

#BattleReady newhope


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gumby_in_co
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Had a chance to deep dive into this topic this morning. I had to read up a little on GDB. I think I get it.

Man on you, go to the LB and leave the guy on you to your outside buddy. Okay. Wheels are turning.

But how does this make the player a "Power"? Where is the extra blocker coming from?

To your original question, regardless of scheme, DP and I went round and round on this topic for years when I was all in on mega splits. We were Gap On Backer. There were very few linebackers that our linemen weren't able to block due to an athletic mismatch. In fact, I don't think there were any with our (Mahonz and I) old team from 6th through 8th grade. We were blessed with backs with great vision and could really take advantage of leverage. So I didn't teach my linemen to "block" linebackers, but simply to stalk them and get in their way and stay in their way. Got a tip from the CSU coach at a Glazier clinic. He called it "block your world", which simply means let the LB decide where he wants to go and take that leverage. Then it's up to the back to use that leverage. 

We had a kid we couldn't block with the new group in 4th grade, but to be fair, none of my backs could block them either.  I had a concept to deal with kids like this, but haven't used it on grass yet. I called it "Cowboy" because I moved my inside sniffer (beast) to a "side saddle" position to the play side of the Beast back. The logic was to force little Singletary to come to the blocker in order to get to the back. The key would be to "slow play" the LB and let him come to you. Now that I'm running beast 100% from under center, I'm not sure how I'd make that work. Hasn't been an issue yet. We never practice Beast, but no one has been able to stop it. I'll keep "Cowboy" in my pocket until I think we need it.

 

 

When in doot . . . glass and oot.


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J. Potter (seabass)
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Posted by: @terrypjohnson

2. We used the video game approach to teach SAB, where we started at the end and worked backwards. This clicked with one of our assistants, who then asked to work with the offensive line. He got them so fired up that I turned things over to him and coached the backs.

That is one of THE most effective ways to teach these types of things. Knowing what it looks like when you've done it right before you've done it right is very powerful.


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gumby_in_co
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Posted by: @seabass
Posted by: @terrypjohnson

2. We used the video game approach to teach SAB, where we started at the end and worked backwards. This clicked with one of our assistants, who then asked to work with the offensive line. He got them so fired up that I turned things over to him and coached the backs.

That is one of THE most effective ways to teach these types of things. Knowing what it looks like when you've done it right before you've done it right is very powerful.

It has become standard for me as well as the HC of the 3rd grade team I help with. Huge time saver.

When in doot . . . glass and oot.


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