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Blocking Drills for the 3-back


CoachAJ-SC
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Greetings, Gentlemen. For years we’ve struggled with getting our 3-back to effectively execute the kick-out block on the DE. Many times the DE will cut inside him, and other times he’ll just totally whiff the block. We’ve always placed aggressive, athletic kids in that spot, but we still struggle. Do you guys have any other suggestions in addition to the diamond blocking drill? Any pointers will be greatly appreciated.


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Coach Correa
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He has to lead with playside foot and get his head in the hole (AIM FOR INSIDE EARHOLE). Everything with any kind of blocking starts with your feet head placement is crucial also. Bye teaching it this way it reinforces that your fb is on his proper inside out path.

Head Coach Tito Correa New Britain Raiders 14-U


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Rockets11
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If the de is able to cut inside then the path is wrong.  Coach Correa  described the proper path he needs to take.  That way if he whiffs the end will still have to come up field and go around him. 

Also if he's whiffing a lot he may be trying to get into the block too early and overextend himself.  He shouldn't be lunging at the defender. 


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PSLCOACHROB
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We called it a banana path. This way you are also blocking out and back. If he is whiffing he needs to gather his feet a bit. Think breaking down before a tackle bit not quite as much. Go to the path under control and not worrying about blowing the de up. Good technique will get the block made. Also, one of the biggest causes of whiffing is the head being down.


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CoachDP
(@coachdp)
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We called it a banana path.

--^ This.

one of the biggest causes of whiffing is the head being down.

--^ This.  We've found it effective to tell our Fullback (actually, all of our offensive players) to "find" your blockee as you are coming up to the LOS after breaking the huddle.  Some players just wait to see what appears and thus never find their defender.  Identifying him before the play has helped our players immensely.

--In the end, whiffing on a block is identical to whiffing on a tackle, and yet many players find it easier to perform the latter.  I believe that is most often due to blocking drills being taught entirely differently than tackling drills.  We tell our players that blocking is easier than tackling in that in tackling, you have to hit, wrap, drive and take down while in blocking you only have to hit and drive.  Our blocking drills are identical to our tackling drills without the wrap and take-down component.  If he misses his man in a blocking drill, that same player should be missing his man in a tackling drill.

--Dave

"The Greater the Teacher, the More Powerful the Player."

The Mission Statement: "I want to show any young man that he is far tougher than he thinks, that he can accomplish more than what he dreamed and that his work ethic will take him wherever he wants to go."

#BattleReady newhope


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davecisar
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We cover this during Indys
Banana path is correct
First step is with outside foot TOWARDS the LOS- then pivot to outside path
Aiming point is the inside foot of the TE
If the DE gets deeper, that's good, it takes him out of the play and makes it an easier block

We start with a fit in a shield- stationary
Then we do the same- but splatter drill it with the landing mat- stationary target
Then we do moving target fit and buzz feet
Then we do moving target on splatter drill

However beautiful the strategy, you should occasionally look at the results.Winston Churchill


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CoachDP
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If the DE gets deeper, that's good, it takes him out of the play and makes it an easier block

^ Yes, generally.  Especially in youth ball where many DEs overplay contain and Defensive Coordinators don't correct it.  In our offense, the Fullback's kick-out is the most important block (if there is such a thing).  And the DEs we face don't overplay contain and are quick enough to get around the Fullback's shoulder to make the tackle.  As a result, our Fullbacks spend a lot time working their blocks on each other so that they are all getting coached at the same time, in the same way.  We have to have this block made successfully, or we have no play on Power.  And while we are the only team we faced this year that run this offense, it's really no secret on how to stop it and a good DE who can stuff or get around the Fullback's kick-out is a problem.

--DP

"The Greater the Teacher, the More Powerful the Player."

The Mission Statement: "I want to show any young man that he is far tougher than he thinks, that he can accomplish more than what he dreamed and that his work ethic will take him wherever he wants to go."

#BattleReady newhope


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Test Account
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^ Yes, generally.  Especially in youth ball where many DEs overplay contain and Defensive Coordinators don't correct it.  In our offense, the Fullback's kick-out is the most important block (if there is such a thing).  And the DEs we face don't overplay contain and are quick enough to get around the Fullback's shoulder to make the tackle.  As a result, our Fullbacks spend a lot time working their blocks on each other so that they are all getting coached at the same time, in the same way.  We have to have this block made successfully, or we have no play on Power.  And while we are the only team we faced this year that run this offense, it's really no secret on how to stop it and a good DE who can stuff or get around the Fullback's kick-out is a problem.

--DP

teams are not built inside out.  Good teams can control edges especially teams that claim to run off tackle based offenses

Please don't PM or respond to this Member. It is an account for all of the posts from abandoned or banned Member Accounts.


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Bob Goodman
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Greetings, Gentlemen. For years we’ve struggled with getting our 3-back to effectively execute the kick-out block on the DE. Many times the DE will cut inside him, and other times he’ll just totally whiff the block. We’ve always placed aggressive, athletic kids in that spot, but we still struggle. Do you guys have any other suggestions in addition to the diamond blocking drill? Any pointers will be greatly appreciated.

One of the hard things about making such a block is seeing your target in time, so a good drill should involve vision screens.


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CoachDP
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a good drill should involve vision screens.

Explain.

--Dave

"The Greater the Teacher, the More Powerful the Player."

The Mission Statement: "I want to show any young man that he is far tougher than he thinks, that he can accomplish more than what he dreamed and that his work ethic will take him wherever he wants to go."

#BattleReady newhope


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Bob Goodman
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By "vision screens" I mean people in the way, milling around, to block the view of the target.


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