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Cisar Single Wing - Sweep to the Quick/Short side without a wing or motion


C-Rob
(@tso1696)
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Was wondering if any of the Cisar Single Wingers on here run a Sweep to the left side without moving a wing over or using motion?  If so, can you describe how you block it.  

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tiger46
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It's been many years since I ran Cisar's SW and we never tried sweeping left that way. We always had our WB in motion. Which back do you want carrying the ball? What blocking rules do you use now? And, What age group? 

 

“It is easier to build strong children than to repair broken men. ”  ― Frederick Douglass


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COACHDT
(@hawk2018)
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We would nasty split our LE, we called it "ugly" and down block the DE.  If the DE moved out with the LE,we ran inside him.   

This post was modified 2 weeks ago by COACHDT

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C-Rob
(@tso1696)
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I guess I could have been more clear in what I was asking.  Really looking to hit the weakside with a sweep from the base formation.  Was hoping to do it with #2 back.  With that said, I believe we are going to "borrow" from @32wedge and use his Reverse scheme as a quick/short side sweep and will do so with the #4.  

 

I think if we could do it with the #2 but would need him to delay a bit before taking the sweep path, but I do like the 247.  At least on paper any way.

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Bob Goodman
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Posted by: @tso1696

I think if we could do it with the #2 but would need him to delay a bit before taking the sweep path, but I do like the 247.  At least on paper any way.

That is indeed a traditional way to do it as a sweep by either the 1 or 2 back, the delay commonly being a bucket step and raising to pass.


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tiger46
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Our quick end was always an MPR type in the seasons that we ran Cisar's SW. So, none of those players were much help with blocking DE's or LB's. We used Calande's GOOD/GOD blocking.

We hiked the ball to #2. #2 was the ball carrier.  #1 sealed the DE.  RG & #3 would lead around #1's block. We had #4 go in fast motion right behind #2 to lead and aim at the CB.  If #1 couldn't seal the DE he blocked out and RG & #3 would try to run under that block.

We also ran it with #3 in a left wing position. And, we also ran it from a Jet formation with #2 lined up split to the left.  

 

“It is easier to build strong children than to repair broken men. ”  ― Frederick Douglass


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Bob Goodman
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Posted by: @tiger46

Our quick end was always an MPR type in the seasons that we ran Cisar's SW. So, none of those players were much help with blocking DE's or LB's. We used Calande's GOOD/GOD blocking.

We hiked the ball to #2. #2 was the ball carrier.  #1 sealed the DE.  RG & #3 would lead around #1's block. We had #4 go in fast motion right behind #2 to lead and aim at the CB.  If #1 couldn't seal the DE he blocked out and RG & #3 would try to run under that block.

How might you adjust the blocking if you didn't motion #4?  Consider that if you don't motion #4, you might bring less of the LBs to the short side.


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tiger46
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@bob-goodman

Yes, we considered it.  But, #4- especially in our 1st season with SW- was a superior player to any LB that followed the motion. We preferred that he was in on the action regardless of who followed him.  Often youth CB's are out of position or so weak of players that we didn't have to bother to block them. So, #4 could pick off a safety, or whatever else showed up, instead.  Our pulling RG was one of our starting LBs. He was our leading tackler. Very good at operating in open space. We felt that our players had more practice at making open field blocks than our opponents had at avoiding/getting through open field blocks. We usually won those contests. Also, #4's motion to the left was great for when we used it as a variation on 26 Power.  It drew the LB's away from the  pulling RG and #2.  We called it Loop 26 Power, iirc. 

This post was modified 2 weeks ago by tiger46

“It is easier to build strong children than to repair broken men. ”  ― Frederick Douglass


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