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terrypjohnson
(@terrypjohnson)
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Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 287
United States
Head Coach
October 21, 2020 9:21 am  

@coyote George Carlin once said, "I don't have pet peeves. I have major psychotic freaking hatreds".

What the All-Star header said to you is one of my major psychotic hatreds. When my oldest son made the 8U All-Stars in his first season, they wanted to know why he couldn't block a 190-pound kid man-on-man. "Pulling and angle blocking is for sissies who don't know real football. Now, I've got to undo that poor coaching. He ain't gonna play in the NFL by doin' all that"

Whiskey. Tango. Foxtrot.

 

Fight 'em until Hell freezes over, then fight 'em on the ice -- Dutch Meyer


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gumby_in_co
(@gumby_in_co)
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Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 4187
October 21, 2020 9:38 am  

@terrypjohnson My best friend in HS was my RG on the Sophomore team. I was the QB. We ran the wishbone, both power and option and one day, we were going over FB dive. Our coach said, "For this play to work, we need the guards and tackles to drive their man 5 yards downfield. Everybody looked at my buddy and burst out laughing because he was 5'4" tall and weighed 105lbs.

 

When in doot . . . glass and oot.


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rpatric
(@rpatric)
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Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 195
Maryland
6th - 8th
Head Coach
October 21, 2020 11:49 am  

@coyote

this is something that is really exciting to me. I used to think that I needed the players to bring something to the table. I have since realized through countless conversations with great coaches that a blank slate is much better than a loaded bag of who knows what. None of the players will have been told what they can or can't do. I will make for certain that I can make them successful at what we do. Too often we hear what young kids can't do. I happen to believe that they are capable of much more than I can teach them in 1 season. I don't plan on limiting them, just trying to come to the table with the best plan for them. If scratching the direct snap prevents a fumble or 2 every game, i'll have to consider it. However, if I find that I can teach it clearly and mitigate disaster in the exchange, it will definitely be the route we take.


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rpatric
(@rpatric)
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Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 195
Maryland
6th - 8th
Head Coach
October 21, 2020 11:58 am  

@terrypjohnson

Knuckle draggers!!! They still think this game is an extension of their manhood. Kids usually hate playing for that guy. Any a**hole can coach a collection of uber talented players. The real good ones know the value of creating leverage and angles. If your 90 lb tackle puts a 150 lb d tackle on his arse with a well executed angle block, what's the difference. The result is fantastic no matter what the process was.

Sorry, I deal with these guys all the time. Funny thing is they are all insecure weenies for the most part. They get mouthy with me because they can't contribute to the conversation by offering an intelligent response.


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gumby_in_co
(@gumby_in_co)
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Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 4187
October 21, 2020 1:21 pm  

@rpatric

My current team has more than their fair share of kids who REALLY need to be coached up. To me the most rewarding part of coaching is bringing that hopeless kid up to being a contributor and maybe even a star. My semi-well documented effort with P had really become the highlight of my season. It goes way beyond what he does on the football field. We've developed a relationship that I hope continues into his adulthood. Maybe one day, he and I will coach his son together. 

This reminds me. Mahonz texted us a FB post from a former player's mom. They had to move away to AZ and the kid has had a miserable season. In fact, Mom just pulled him from the team. She mentioned me favorably in the FB post and man, that really made my whole week. He was one of those kids who needed a LOT of extra coaching and apparently his new staff isn't up to that task. I'm going to shoot a short video for the player and email it to Mom. 

 

When in doot . . . glass and oot.


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Coyote
(@coyote)
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Joined: 12 months ago
Posts: 195
3rd - 5th
Coordinator
October 21, 2020 1:34 pm  
Posted by: @gumby_in_co

o me the most rewarding part of coaching is bringing that hopeless kid up to being a contributor and maybe even a star

I think it was Wrestling Coach Bruce Burnett in a clinic said that our job as coaches is to teach the weak kids to beat the average kids, the average kids to beat the good kids and the good kids to beat the great kids.  The great kids are might be more fun to coach, but they're going to be great anyway...  focus on the kids who need it most.

Coaching up those mid-level and lower level talents is where we elevate our teams as a whole. 

Umm.... why does that 6 ft tall 9 yr old have a goatee...?


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Coyote
(@coyote)
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3rd - 5th
Coordinator
October 21, 2020 1:44 pm  
Posted by: @rpatric

a blank slate is much better than a loaded bag of who knows what.

FWIW, we had 7 of 14 kids who had never played before.  Someone said that practice doesn't make perfect, perfect practice makes perfect, sometimes 'experience' works against the kid.

(We started with 16, but the HC gave one $2 to buy a drink at the concession stand, and we never saw him again, the other had been signed up for our age group, but half way through the 1st practice we found out he belonged in the Pee Wees, informed his mom at the break and they moved him down) 

Umm.... why does that 6 ft tall 9 yr old have a goatee...?


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CoachDP
(@coachdp)
Kryptonite
Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 17478
North Carolina
High School
October 21, 2020 3:23 pm  
Posted by: @coyote

The great kids are might be more fun to coach, but they're going to be great anyway.

A player's athletic ability has never been a factor in how enjoyable I've found them to coach.  I've found that their personality has little to do with their talent (or lack thereof).  The players that I've "enjoyed" being around the most, had talent levels from all over the spectrum.  But that's just my experience.

--Dave

"The Greater the Teacher, the More Powerful the Player."

The Mission Statement: "I want to show any young man that he is far tougher than he thinks, that he can accomplish more than what he dreamed and that his work ethic will take him wherever he wants to go."

#BattleReady newhope


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CoachDP
(@coachdp)
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Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 17478
North Carolina
High School
October 21, 2020 3:25 pm  
Posted by: @coyote
 
FWIW, we had 7 of 14 kids who had never played before.

And yet, you still ran the table.

I hope that helps put to rest the "But we had X number of players who'd never played before" excuse, from coaches who refuse to look in the mirror.

--Dave

"The Greater the Teacher, the More Powerful the Player."

The Mission Statement: "I want to show any young man that he is far tougher than he thinks, that he can accomplish more than what he dreamed and that his work ethic will take him wherever he wants to go."

#BattleReady newhope


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Coyote
(@coyote)
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Joined: 12 months ago
Posts: 195
3rd - 5th
Coordinator
October 21, 2020 4:48 pm  

 

Posted by: @coachdp

A player's athletic ability has never been a factor in how enjoyable I've found them to coach.

I was repeating what Coach Burnett said.  Contextually, as I remember it, he was talking about how with the national teams he got to coach elite kids and they were a ton of fun, but for us who coached HS and younger, we didn't get a roomful of elite kids.  His point was, that the more talented kids might be more fun to coach, because they picked it faster and were able to execute it more quickly, but our focus has to be on the lesser talents in wrestling room.

Some of the most satisfying kids to coach have been those less talented or special needs kids.   Esp. those kids who are hungry to learn. 

 

Umm.... why does that 6 ft tall 9 yr old have a goatee...?


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Beansko82
(@beansko82)
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October 21, 2020 7:22 pm  

I think you’re on the right track adjusting the depth of the backs.

Here’s a progression we used to train our snappers and also as a warmup for them.

1.  Start out with the center standing upright throwing a pass to another player (we used the back up center and had them alternate so that both got reps).  Doesn’t have to be far, in fact we, at most,  had them 3 yards apart.  

2.  We’d then have them face away and bend over at the waist and practice passing the ball between their legs to their partner.

3.   We would then progress to having them snap from an their stance with the ball on the ground.

4.  Snap and step.

5a.  Snap and step, with a third player or coach standing over them and giving them a shot with a hand shield.

5b.  If you’re planning on having them covering for the pulling guard I would have them practice this as well.  For us we would do a number of reps with someone over them with the shield and then an equal number of reps with someone lined up over where the pulling guard would be with tackling dummy so that they could practice their crab blocking.

6.  Last but not least, full contact with another player lined up over them with instructions to collision the center in an attempt to disrupt the snap.

That last step is important.  As I’m sure you know with any direct snap or shotgun offense opposing DCs are gonna come after your center in an attempt to blow up the play.  

A center who is able to get off a clean snap and protect himself is great, but a center who can that and put a bully boy NT on his 4th point of contact is even better.  I know it’s not going to happen every play especially with a single wing snapper who has his head down.  However if he can do it a couple times a game it will go a long way to slowing down or stopping the other team doing that sort of stuff.

 

 


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CoachDP
(@coachdp)
Kryptonite
Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 17478
North Carolina
High School
October 21, 2020 8:38 pm  
Posted by: @coyote

His point was, that the more talented kids might be more fun to coach, because they picked it faster and were able to execute it more quickly

I still don't get it.  I may be glad a kid was athletic or learned quickly, but that had nothing to do with how much I enjoyed being around him. 

--Dave

"The Greater the Teacher, the More Powerful the Player."

The Mission Statement: "I want to show any young man that he is far tougher than he thinks, that he can accomplish more than what he dreamed and that his work ethic will take him wherever he wants to go."

#BattleReady newhope


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32wedge
(@32wedge)
Silver Moderator
Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 712
Virginia
Middle School
Only / Head Coach
October 22, 2020 6:03 am  
Posted by: @coachdp
Posted by: @coyote

His point was, that the more talented kids might be more fun to coach, because they picked it faster and were able to execute it more quickly

I still don't get it.  I may be glad a kid was athletic or learned quickly, but it nothing to do with how much I enjoyed being around him. 

--Dave

Exactly! 

 

Isaac, one of my all time favorite players, was born with a birth defect in his legs.  He had multiple surgeries when he was little.  When he came out to play football in the 7th grade, he was small, pigeon toed and slow as Christmas.  He worked his but off and wanted a starting position more than anything.  He was always smiling and friendly to everyone even when he was getting picked on.  He always came up to me before practice and asked, "how's your day, Coach?"  He always volunteered to pray before team meals and before games.  I loved that kid and would be happy to coach a dozen more just like him.  He was the best single wing center I have coached.

 


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Coyote
(@coyote)
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Joined: 12 months ago
Posts: 195
3rd - 5th
Coordinator
October 22, 2020 10:17 am  
Posted by: @coachdp

I still don't get it.

That's Ok, it was Coach Burnett's experience, and judging from all the coaches who spend their time with the top-tier kids and don't bother coaching the lower level talents, perhaps its their's as well.  Regardless of talent, Coach Burnett put the emphasis on coaching all the kids and helping them compete one level higher than their natural talent.

Like you, I've found great joy in coaching those less talented and even un-talented kids.   One of my Fav's was the 'the snake'.  Wrestled 135 lbs at 6ft 3in tall.   A bag of bones, neither quick nor strong; a losing JV record his frosh and soph yr.   Something like 4 and 25 varsity his Jr. yr.   Won over 20 matches as a sr. placed 3rd in our conference.   We taught him to use leverage, cross-body ride to slow down & control his opponent, and how to use those extremely long arms to heal pick and front headlock for Takedowns.  He learned to use what God gave him, instead of worrying about what God didn't give him.  

As coaches, that's our job, to teach kids to use what God gave 'em effectively, and overcome / minimize any deficiencies in their talent.

Umm.... why does that 6 ft tall 9 yr old have a goatee...?


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Beansko82
(@beansko82)
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Joined: 5 years ago
Posts: 265
October 26, 2020 6:43 pm  

One thing I forgot to add, with 5/6s you may run into issues with the spiral snap because of the snapper/center’s hand size.  

If this is the case you can try a two-handed end over end snap.  To this have the snapper/center grasp the ball with their thumbs together.  The tips of the thumbs touching the end of the laces, and the middle fingers along the seams.  

The snapper/center will snap the ball by flicking their wrists backwards making sure the forearms contact the inside of the thighs but no further.

Just a thought.


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