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knightsof3
(@knightsof3)
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Has anyone tried a one handed snap with the center looking straight ahead instead of looking between his legs from Cisar's offense?

Against strong defensive teams we sometimes have issues with the center reacting in time from the looking between the legs position reaching or crabbing the defensive tackle in an even front over the pulling guard or stopping an A gap blitz from the inside LB. Some responses might be to teach him to crab better or get a better center, but again my question is can looking straight ahead with a one-handed snap react faster?

If so, what are the pros and cons?


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Bob Goodman
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You don't have to ask that particularly of those running Cisar's offense -- there's long been known to be a tradeoff between aim on the snap and quickness in blocking when it comes to where the snapper's head is.  Dave Cisar himself has said that he knows of teams running his system who have the snapper's head up because of league rules requiring them to be.  Even though in his system all the snaps to the 1 & 2 back are the same, he still says you should snap with the snapper looking if you don't have a rule against it.

In 2015, not running Cisar's system, I had the 8YO snapper's head up, and used a 1-handed snap.  We had 2 snaps: a soft one midway between the deep backs, and one turning the ball sideways to put in the QB's hawk-wing hands.  We did have a few that were lobbed more than I wanted or bounced on the way back, but they were never off to the left or right, and no "balloon" or "adrenaline" snaps over their heads or rifled back.  I think looking forward might actually help prevent adrenaline snaps because the snapper isn't thinking about how he has to quickly get his head up to deal with unseen assailants.


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mahonz
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One handed or two....get that head up.

What is beautiful, lives forever.


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PSLCOACHROB
(@pslcoachrob)
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Our snappers would always find their man and then lift their head. Never had a problem with it. Did the same from pistol and shotgun.


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mozzini
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we always had head up.. it was a confidence booster for the center to know that if all else fails he could "fumble" the ball to our guys.. of course we never taught him to do that.. but I think psychologically it took pressure off him.. I think only once all season he rolled one back there and the play worked anyhow..

Phillipians 4:13


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32wedge
(@32wedge)
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If I am getting good snaps, I don't complain about my center's blocking.  An adjacent tackle will cover the gap left by the puller.  I will have a non-pulling guard protect the center if he is getting beat up by a tough nose tackle.  The only priority for center is good snaps. 


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knightsof3
(@knightsof3)
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The adjacent tackle doesnt fill for the guard when the tackle is also covered with GOD rules. The center has to make that block and its not an easy block even when crabbing.


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PSLCOACHROB
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The adjacent tackle doesnt fill for the guard when the tackle is also covered with GOD rules. The center has to make that block and its not an easy block even when crabbing.

Then don't have him crab. Have him down block. Drill the heck out of the kid. Get him to the point where he can step as he snaps and he will beat ANYBODY off the line. That takes a bunch of time but even if he doesn't get that good with enough reps he can make this block. With zero splits it isn't that hard. Centers do it with 16-24 inch splits all the time, even in youth. Every single time he snaps he should take his first two steps and load his hands to whatever technique you are using. Never let him snap the ball under any circumstances and not take those steps. Never ever.


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32wedge
(@32wedge)
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The adjacent tackle doesnt fill for the guard when the tackle is also covered with GOD rules. The center has to make that block and its not an easy block even when crabbing.

In that case, I suggest using Coach Cisar's SEVEN call and wash everything down.  It has been a few years since I have ran his system but I do not remember having a problem filling the hole with the tackle.  You can also call NO and keep the guard in if penetration is hurting you.

Just keep the good snaps coming.


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mozzini
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You can also call NO and keep the guard in if penetration is hurting you.

Just keep the good snaps coming.

-----^ this! totally forgot about the NO call

Phillipians 4:13


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blockandtackle
(@coacharnold)
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Has anyone tried a one handed snap with the center looking straight ahead instead of looking between his legs from Cisar's offense?

Against strong defensive teams we sometimes have issues with the center reacting in time from the looking between the legs position reaching or crabbing the defensive tackle in an even front over the pulling guard or stopping an A gap blitz from the inside LB. Some responses might be to teach him to crab better or get a better center, but again my question is can looking straight ahead with a one-handed snap react faster?

If so, what are the pros and cons?

This is just a typical "blind" shotgun snap.

The pro is that the C can become a better blocker.

The con is that it makes direct snap stuff much, much harder if you want him snapping to different backs or spots in the backfield like in the traditional SW.

With younger kids, your bad snaps will likely increase.  Bad snaps can and will cost you games.

If you want to do this, find a kid who can throw a football well enough overhand and teach him how to shotgun snap and keep the aiming point for the snap consistent.

As has been mentioned already, there are numerous ways to compensate for the C as a poor blocker if he needs to keep his head down and see where he's snapping.  If you think of him as basically your "QB" and a ball distributor, rather than a blocker, you can see there are creative ways to have a G or even blocking back fill for him.  Keeping his head down should also make it illegal for the defense to cover him up with a NG in most leagues, which can help you up front as well.

An alternative would be to go with an unbalanced I formation set and have the QB take an under center snap, then run SW plays from that with the same blocking schemes and nearly the same backfield actions.  By going under center and simplifying the exchange, you'll get very few bad snaps, more deceptive and quicker hitting plays, and a considerably more effective blocker at C.


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pittpete
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knightsof3

or stopping an A gap blitz from the inside LB

PSLCOACHROB

Every single time he snaps he should take his first two steps and load his hands to whatever technique you are using.

How does having the center blindly step down stop a blitzing LBer?

                                            B
                              E    X X    X X
                                  /  l        l  l
                                O O O  C O O
                                <----l

         


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blockandtackle
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knightsof3
PSLCOACHROB
How does having the center blindly step down stop a blitzing LBer?

                                            B
                              E    X X    X X
                                  /  l        l  l
                                O O O  C O O
                                <----l

       

Think in terms of blocking gaps, not people.  Remember those Xs move after the snap.  Blocking gaps (and, by extension, whatever shows in the gap) keeps you sound against that.

Stepping to the gap means he'll be in position to pick up whatever is coming to that gap and get there with good technique to successfully block it.  If he steps the wrong way or is flat footed, he won't get there in time.  Also, he shouldn't "blindly" step anywhere.  Having his eyes focused on his gap responsibility is extremely important.  If he doesn't see it, he can't block it.

If you don't work on that with every snap, your C will never get good at snapping, stepping, and blocking.  He'll be late or sloppy into his blocked and get whipped every time.  This is the single biggest issue that Cs have at the HS level and below, especially when they have to block a NG who's right in their face.  Nothing will get you beat quicker than a C who can't snap and step so a defender blows right past him in the A gap.


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Bob Goodman
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One point it wouldn't hurt making again here is that a 1-hand snapper is going to have an easier time stepping off the same side foot as his snapping hand.


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knightsof3
(@knightsof3)
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Topic starter  

We rep the snap and step constantly. Its not as simple as getting a better center. A well timed stud lber a gap blitz can blow by an average talent center with his head down...no play only works so many times.

Also as far as the one handed snap being beneficial to step to the same side it doesnt really apply to us since our center is righty but we flip strength so we run power left and right.


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