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Bob Goodman
(@bob-goodman)
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Also as far as the one handed snap being beneficial to step to the same side it doesnt really apply to us since our center is righty but we flip strength so we run power left and right.

Oh, it applies to you, all right.  Unless you've rewired the snapper's cerebellum, you have an easier time in one direction than the other.


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Michael
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I talked to an ex-NFL center who said stepping away from the snapping hand is a much easier block.

I'm big on having the center snap on every blocking drill and putting a fast NG on him during all snapping work that would otherwise be on air.

Michael can not receive PM's, emails or respond to Posts. He passed away in September 2018. To honor his contributions we are leaving his account active. R.I.P - Dumcoach Staff.


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PSLCOACHROB
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knightsof3
PSLCOACHROB
How does having the center blindly step down stop a blitzing LBer?

                                            B
                              E    X X    X X
                                  /  l        l  l
                                O O O  C O O
                                <----l

       

Not what I was saying. In practice, many if not almost all youth coaches allow their centers to snap then stand up, turn around and look for the ball. Instead they need to work footwork and loading and exploding the hands every single time they snap. They should not be separate things. It is just a two step progression that most guys should be drilling as part of their edds in indies. The center just adds in the snap. I just ask that this be done every time the center snaps the ball regardless of what they are doing on the practice field. My centers get lit up if I catch then snapping and not taking their first two step.


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PSLCOACHROB
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I talked to an ex-NFL center who said stepping away from the snapping hand is a much easier block.

I'm big on having the center snap on every blocking drill and putting a fast NG on him during all snapping work that would otherwise be on air.

The snapping hand impedes the leg so it makes sense.


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PSLCOACHROB
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A "seven" or "no" call does not really fix the problem of the center not being able to block a dt when his pst has an on block. You still want to be able to pull and use your base blocking scheme. Better technique will make the block work.

As far as a blitzing backer through the A it depends on how the backer blitzes. If it is the typical youth backer who walks up and becomes a dlineman showing everyone in the world his intent? He is not treated as a backer at that point. Incorporate him into the rules. If he is coming from his linebacker depth at the snap then a wash or no call makes sense.


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Michael
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The snapping hand impedes the leg so it makes sense.

His thing, I believe, was that you want to control the defender with your playside hand.  I'm sure he ran zone almost all the time.  So if he snapped right-handed, on a play to his left he could just grab with the left hand and be done with it, and the right hand would catch up.  But on a play to his right, he'd grab left hand first, and be on the inside half of the defender, and then have to swing the right hand over and on, and then reposition the left hand.

The short version is that snapping with the hand you want as your dominant blocking hand is not a plus.

I may have the details wrong, but I'm pretty confident in the short version.

Michael can not receive PM's, emails or respond to Posts. He passed away in September 2018. To honor his contributions we are leaving his account active. R.I.P - Dumcoach Staff.


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Michael
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If it is the typical youth backer who walks up and becomes a dlineman showing everyone in the world his intent? He is not treated as a backer at that point. Incorporate him into the rules.

I don't think there was ever a moment after I first coached against an actual defense that I didn't automatically see it that way.  But it's crazy how many coaches don't.

I tell our kids, in the run game, if he plays defense, and he's on the line, he's a D-Lineman.  I don't care about his number, his stance, his body type, or what he did on any other play.  D-Lineman are defenders on the line.  Linebackers are in back of the line.  As the commercial slogan in  Philly for Robbins 8th and Walnut used to say, "Our name is our address."

Michael can not receive PM's, emails or respond to Posts. He passed away in September 2018. To honor his contributions we are leaving his account active. R.I.P - Dumcoach Staff.


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mozzini
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I don't think there was ever a moment after I first coached against an actual defense that I didn't automatically see it that way.  But it's crazy how many coaches don't.

I tell our kids, in the run game, if he plays defense, and he's on the line, he's a D-Lineman.  I don't care about his number, his stance, his body type, or what he did on any other play.  D-Lineman are defenders on the line.  Linebackers are in back of the line.  As the commercial slogan in  Philly for Robbins 8th and Walnut used to say, "Our name is our address."

If things go th way they're looking.. pretty soon it wont matter because everyone on the field will be in a 2 point stance.. and instead of blocking we will be pillow fighting  ::)

Phillipians 4:13


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PSLCOACHROB
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Or belly dancing.


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pittpete
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PSLCOACHROB
(@pslcoachrob)
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That snap works. One thing to reaaly watch is how far in front of the snapper the ball is. The further away from the waist line the higher thw chance for a high snap. Under or just in front of the nose helps keep the ball down. Pendulum effect.


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mahonz
(@mahonz)
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Or belly dancing.

I fixed it....Michael let me know. I cant remember doing that but Im sure I did.

soccer

soccer

soccer

belly dancing

....all good.

What is beautiful, lives forever.


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32wedge
(@32wedge)
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A "seven" or "no" call does not really fix the problem of the center not being able to block a dt when his pst has an on block. You still want to be able to pull and use your base blocking scheme. Better technique will make the block work.

I totally agree with you in most cases and I should have explained myself more clearly in that earlier post. 

Yes you have to coach that center to get over there and fill that vacated gap, but  everyone does not always have a center capable of making the snap and the block.  Some years I have had a strong center and some years I had to play what I had.  I have played some small and weak players at center because they were the best snappers and I just didn't have a lot of depth to replace them with.  If I have a guy who can accurately make all the snaps with his head up and be a great blocker that is awesome.  Even if I don't have that center, I can still be successful by keeping my backs up at 2 yards depth, have my snapper look between his legs and his neighbors help him with his blocking responsibilities.  I can scheme around penetration problems using Coach Cisar's adjustments, but bad snaps will kill me every time. 


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PSLCOACHROB
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I totally agree with you in most cases and I should have explained myself more clearly in that earlier post. 

Yes you have to coach that center to get over there and fill that vacated gap, but  everyone does not always have a center capable of making the snap and the block.  Some years I have had a strong center and some years I had to play what I had.  I have played some small and weak players at center because they were the best snappers and I just didn't have a lot of depth to replace them with.  If I have a guy who can accurately make all the snaps with his head up and be a great blocker that is awesome.  Even if I don't have that center, I can still be successful by keeping my backs up at 2 yards depth, have my snapper look between his legs and his neighbors help him with his blocking responsibilities.  I can scheme around penetration problems using Coach Cisar's adjustments, but bad snaps will kill me every time.

I was not trying to say you were wrong. Just pointing out that often coaches look for an answer through scheme when the answer is technique or as BMJ would say just out toughing the opponent. But scheme is  the answer other times. Coaches can draw up ways to attack Dave's sw that can cause problems. For that stuff he has answers like no pull and 7. Sometimes on small rosters lack of depth can be a problem that just can not be overcome. I get that. But those are the teams where technique must be strongly emphasized.


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coachkev
(@coachkev)
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End over end snap works every time. Center head can be up


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