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QB-WR "Look" Pass  

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coachtut
(@coachtut)
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August 16, 2013 11:15 am  

I know we have all probably heard about the QB/WR look pass.  Usually this involves the QB and WR communicating and the whole team running the called play but the QB fires it to the WR on a quick screen etc.

My question is, how do you guys communicate this? 

The reason why I ask, our most successful pass is our "snake" pass.  From a 2x2 formation it is a quick seam pass to our #2 WR's.  Our QB makes a pre-snap read and then fires it, (or floats it just a little), right off the snap.

I call SNAKE if the OLB's start to cheat, and we are no huddle all the time.  I would love to give my QB and #2's the freedom to run this play whenever the defense gives it to us.  Problem is without good communication it could be disasterous.  Our #2 is responsible for blocking the OLB on most plays, if there is a miscommunication that could mean a turnover.

I want to hear how you guys communicate this with your QB's/WR's.

Thanks!

Coach Tut


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robwhitlow
(@robwhitlow)
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August 16, 2013 12:17 pm  

We have yet to really give our QB or receivers this freedom. We do however have quick calls from the sideline.
The basics are just calling players first name and the route from their learned tree.

90% of the time it is a simple 0 route called because we see an opening.

If you were supposed to watch your mouth all the time I doubt your eyes would be above it. - Mike Cooley / DBT


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coachgregory
(@coachgregory)
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August 16, 2013 1:49 pm  

I know we have all probably heard about the QB/WR look pass.  Usually this involves the QB and WR communicating and the whole team running the called play but the QB fires it to the WR on a quick screen etc.

My question is, how do you guys communicate this? 

The reason why I ask, our most successful pass is our "snake" pass.  From a 2x2 formation it is a quick seam pass to our #2 WR's.  Our QB makes a pre-snap read and then fires it, (or floats it just a little), right off the snap.

I call SNAKE if the OLB's start to cheat, and we are no huddle all the time.  I would love to give my QB and #2's the freedom to run this play whenever the defense gives it to us.  Problem is without good communication it could be disasterous.  Our #2 is responsible for blocking the OLB on most plays, if there is a miscommunication that could mean a turnover.

I want to hear how you guys communicate this with your QB's/WR's.

Thanks!

I have been using the look concept for a long time...we call it from the sideline.  We use a call from each receiver to the QB...when we call that tag it alerts both the QB and RECEIVER...takes it out the hand of young QB and WR adn allows you to control it.  We have racked up over 100 yards in passing on this concept in a single game a few times...

Jack

Exsisto Fortis, Exsisto Validus


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robwhitlow
(@robwhitlow)
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August 16, 2013 2:01 pm  

I have been using the look concept for a long time...we call it from the sideline.  We use a call from each receiver to the QB...when we call that tag it alerts both the QB and RECEIVER...takes it out the hand of young QB and WR adn allows you to control it.  We have racked up over 100 yards in passing on this concept in a single game a few times...

Jack

Jack, do you give each receiver a single route for the tag? IE Little Joey always runs inside slant on the "wildman" call, and only "wildman" applies to little Joey?

This is an interesting concept, and I want to make sure I am getting it.

If you were supposed to watch your mouth all the time I doubt your eyes would be above it. - Mike Cooley / DBT


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coachtut
(@coachtut)
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August 16, 2013 2:12 pm  

That's how I'm getting it.  One of those kids in that position is named Cameron, I call him CAMO all the time. I can yell that and that would work. 

I am not one to give up much control but I honestly think these kids could handle it......

I have talented, smart kids at QB and both WR's. 

If I saw an opening I would just call it from the get-go but I am looking for a solution to getting up on the ball after the play is called and that OLB walking up to blitz.

Coach Tut


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Dusty Ol Fart
(@youth-coach)
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August 16, 2013 5:03 pm  

We tried it with mixed results simply because the receiver blew the call. Key for us was the amount of space the Defense was giving the receivers. 

Colleges call them You/Me.  Doug calls it Smoke, We used Fire!  All it was designed to do was get the ball out there like a screen and use that lay off against them.  We did it a lot in 2 x 2.

Not MPP... ONE TASK!  Teach them!  🙂


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Jburk
(@jburk)
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August 17, 2013 7:15 am  

I have seen a coach run this before, where the receiver will literally just scratch his butt when the QB is looking at him; that was the signal. LOL
LOL...and it worked well.  🙂

The sword is more important than the shield.


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coachgregory
(@coachgregory)
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August 18, 2013 6:39 pm  

Jack, do you give each receiver a single route for the tag? IE Little Joey always runs inside slant on the "wildman" call, and only "wildman" applies to little Joey?

This is an interesting concept, and I want to make sure I am getting it.

The classis LOOK has the receiver simply drop his inside foot and face the QB.  The QB simply turns, sets, and throws the ball to the receiver.  The other receiver (if any) blocks the MDM...  I don't run any complex routes...it is simply turn and passer throw...get vertical to daylight.

Nothing fancy and this is our initial passer to receiver development works.

Jack

Exsisto Fortis, Exsisto Validus


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