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Bulgarian coach says start weight training at 8yrs old  

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ZACH
 ZACH
(@bucksweep58)
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March 4, 2020 9:58 am  

Fun article to read. Abadjiev is one of the original atheltes and coach of "that" Bulgarian weight lifting team that people talk about when they talk about "Bulgarian method". 

 

https://simplifaster.com/articles/youth-strength-training-benefits/  

 

"coach asked Abadjiev at what age athletes could start lifting maximum weights. His answer: 8.

 

Perplexed, the coach clarified his question by explaining that he meant maximum weights—as in 100 percent. Abadjiev’s answer: 8."

I can explain it to you, I can't understand if for you.


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gumby_in_co
(@gumby_in_co)
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March 4, 2020 2:34 pm  

Excellent article. There are so many "old wives' tales" surrounding weight training. Jack Gregory used to have a whole category for youth strength and conditioning on his website. He pointed me to a website called "strong kids", which doesn't appear to exist anymore, at least not in the same format that I remember.

Statistically, power lifting is the #1 safest competitive sport . . . by a long shot. Injuries are pretty much limited to dropping weights, which can be mitigated by proper supervision and spotting.  Pre-pubescent children won't see significant muscle mass gains, but there's a lot of evidence that shows increased bone density and ligament/tendon resiliency as a result of heavy weight training.

Up until age 13, my son was incredibly fast and skilled in hockey, but it never showed up on the stat sheet. He could dominate games in the neutral zone with his speed, but just couldn't seem to light the lamp. After his first year of 13/14 AA hockey, he asked about weight training. I agreed to start power lifting with my son that Summer. Jack's materials were fresh on my mind at the time and one of you guys (might have been you or Calande) posted a power lifting regimen on this site. 2 different workouts. First was Bench, Squat, Pulls. Second was Deadlift, Power Cleans, Military. We went 3 days per week. ABA one week, BAB the next. 3 sets of 5. If you can complete 3 sets of 5, add 10lbs for the next workout.  My son was on the verge of puberty at the time, so he didn't get huge, but he did get STRONG. 

His teammates dads pretty much bullied me over the subject and most of them spent a lot of time in the gym. I heard everything from growth plates, stunting growth, losing speed . . . I heard it all. A good friend of mine went so far as to call me an idiot. 

Results?  That year he led the entire league in goals, assists and scoring, averaging 2.5 points per game. His team went 20-0 in league play, 5-1 in the playoffs (double elimination), 60-8 overall (tournaments, etc), won the state championship and competed at Nationals. It was the first time any team from our club won a state championship.

When he had the puck, he simply bullied his way to the far post, dragging defensemen and taking them along for the ride. Ask Mahonz. He is NOT a big guy. Above average height,, but not tall and on the verge of being skinny. He had a weird way of taking penalties when a defenseman would throw a check and bounce off of him. HE would get the penalty because it just didn't "look right".

Anyway, it's good to have solid sources backed by science when talking to people about their kids training with weight. 

When in doot . . . glass and oot.


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ZACH
 ZACH
(@bucksweep58)
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March 5, 2020 8:41 am  

That's a very common story, shame about all the wife's tales in performance we would have better athletes all over the place.  

 

 

 

 

I can explain it to you, I can't understand if for you.


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gumby_in_co
(@gumby_in_co)
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March 5, 2020 11:56 am  

The only real issue I see in the subject is whether said 8 year old really wants to be lifting weights, or is he being forced into it?

When in doot . . . glass and oot.


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ZACH
 ZACH
(@bucksweep58)
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March 5, 2020 2:39 pm  
Posted by: @gumby_in_co

The only real issue I see in the subject is whether said 8 year old really wants to be lifting weights, or is he being forced into it?

Eh little of both, youngest I've trained is 9 I believe, I offered as a way to try and channel the kids aggression...worked while he was consistent but ever kid likes to be strong. Does that mean we reached or show the bench press...uh no

I can explain it to you, I can't understand if for you.


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Vince148
(@vince148)
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March 12, 2020 7:45 pm  

To me, it's not a question of whether or not they can be weight training at that age. Personally, I believe they should. However, the issue for me is whether or not they have the maturity to do so. I've seen way too many 10 year olds just not maintain proper focus. For me, I've found 11 years old or older to work well. In fact, I was quite surprised at the difference in "maturity" between a 10 yo and an 11 yo. For 10 and under, I prefer more bodyweight strengthening.


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Seth54
(@seth54)
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June 22, 2020 7:05 am  

@gumby_in_co

 

My son is 9 now and I started working with him at age 8. He became interested when he saw me training in my garage gym. I took it as an opportunity to teach him proper form and encourage his interest. After the initial novelty wore off his interest waned, but every now and then he’ll see me working out and ask to jump in. Not sure there are many kids that young that could sustain interest week in and week out without someone pushing them 

 


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ZACH
 ZACH
(@bucksweep58)
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June 22, 2020 6:50 pm  

I don't have kids, however I have worked with kids of friends. If they see progress they will continue. I always text the parents and the kid together to tell them when I'll be training and include an invite, every time. It's not perfect but it's what I do. 

 

So maybe something as easy as giving your kid some notice the day of that you wanna sling some pig iron with him.  Make it a club, if you have funds make a shirt a banner . A poster board of progress. Always encourage and teach. 

 

 

I can explain it to you, I can't understand if for you.


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