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Monster
(@monster)
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M

I will never stop doing our warm up routine. It has tremendous value even if it has nothing to do with warming up the youth body. It begins the regiment....or is that regimen?

I think the 'q' is silent.

Mission Statement: To make a genuine effort at every opportunity to help those around me build and maintain a commitment to success.


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PSLCOACHROB
(@pslcoachrob)
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About 15 years ago when I first moved back to Denver there was an 8th grade team in my Org that had never lost a game since they started out as second graders.

So Jr and I went and watched them play a game.

The first thing I noticed in pre game was there were no coaches visible. I had to really look around to find them. They never approached the kids for the entire pre game. They ran it all them selves.

Right then I told myself...that is what I want my teams to do. Cant do it with the younger kids but you can certainly do it with the older ones.

Was 21-0 at the end of the first Q....35-0 at the half. I'd seen enough. They were a machine that no longer required coaches.

We have had 4 teams do this. All went to nationals. We didn't instruct them to do it they just started doing it. Our youngest to do it was a jpw team which is 9 and 10yos basically. When you demand accountability they start to demand it from there teammates. When they demand it from themselves they don't need you for the silly stuff, they just need help with the x's and o's, scouting, practice planning etc. It is an impressive thing to behold for sure. I watch many of the great teams that go through PW nationals and many of them have that as well. When you get a team that buys into what you are doing at that level game day is a joy. No stress because the team takes care of itself. They know what to do and when to do it and they know people are watching and they love it.


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Monster
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We have had 4 teams do this. All went to nationals. We didn't instruct them to do it they just started doing it. Our youngest to do it was a jpw team which is 9 and 10yos basically. When you demand accountability they start to demand it from there teammates. When they demand it from themselves they don't need you for the silly stuff, they just need help with the x's and o's, scouting, practice planning etc. It is an impressive thing to behold for sure. I watch many of the great teams that go through PW nationals and many of them have that as well. When you get a team that buys into what you are doing at that level game day is a joy. No stress because the team takes care of itself. They know what to do and when to do it and they know people are watching and they love it.

Quit it. I'm getting all flustered over here.

Mission Statement: To make a genuine effort at every opportunity to help those around me build and maintain a commitment to success.


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Michael
(@michael)
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Can't you just tell them that play time is over and football time is beginning?

Michael can not receive PM's, emails or respond to Posts. He passed away in September 2018. To honor his contributions we are leaving his account active. R.I.P - Dumcoach Staff.


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PSLCOACHROB
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Quit it. I'm getting all flustered over here.

I was thinking about why those teams got to that point. Our 2009 team doesn't really count because it was a good chunk of our 2008 team that was already doing it. The one thing I came up with is a 100% buy in from the staff about accountability. We never let any excuses be acceptable. The parents started to buy into what we were doing(man do I miss those days) because they knew the kids were being held accountable and they could carry that over into their home lives as well. Plus we didn't allow the parents to be blamed for being late. Our motto in 08 and 09 was "Do your Job". It was something we barked at the kids everyday and they started to understand that the only way a well oiled machine moves is if every piece is doing what it is supposed to do. We demonstrated what happens when a kid misses a block, uses the wrong footwork etc. Then the thing that makes a team truly great happens. The lightbulb goes off about the importance of attention to detail. We all tell our teams about how important that is but they don't get it. Heck, most youth coaches I see don't get it. But when they truly believe in being accountable the next logical step in precision. Then they realize one day that they can start practice(warmups) without you. Then they realize they can run through edds without you. Then the leaders start running the team and it truly becomes "theirs".


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Monster
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I was thinking about why those teams got to that point. Our 2009 team doesn't really count because it was a good chunk of our 2008 team that was already doing it. The one thing I came up with is a 100% buy in from the staff about accountability. We never let any excuses be acceptable. The parents started to buy into what we were doing(man do I miss those days) because they knew the kids were being held accountable and they could carry that over into their home lives as well. Plus we didn't allow the parents to be blamed for being late. Our motto in 08 and 09 was "Do your Job". It was something we barked at the kids everyday and they started to understand that the only way a well oiled machine moves is if every piece is doing what it is supposed to do. We demonstrated what happens when a kid misses a block, uses the wrong footwork etc. Then the thing that makes a team truly great happens. The lightbulb goes off about the importance of attention to detail. We all tell our teams about how important that is but they don't get it. Heck, most youth coaches I see don't get it. But when they truly believe in being accountable the next logical step in precision. Then they realize one day that they can start practice(warmups) without you. Then they realize they can run through edds without you. Then the leaders start running the team and it truly becomes "theirs".

I've had a few coaches meetings so far, and I've been stressing the highlighted point over and over. Let's be complete PITA early on about lining up right, being in the right spot, communicating with one another, etc. Between starting off with this drill, doing the enduro to start our first practice, and just generally riding the players about "getting it right", I'm hoping to instill in them the need for accountability.

Don't you love it when you discover that a key to your past success wasn't any technical thing like a play or a specific drill, but a mindset and approach about the team in general?

Mission Statement: To make a genuine effort at every opportunity to help those around me build and maintain a commitment to success.


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PSLCOACHROB
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I always knew I wasn't a football genius. My header during those years is certainly more knowledgeable than me but its not like he is Bill Walsh either. Running drills and a facemelter offense isn't going to win you games. At least not the ones that matter. It wasn't until after that run we had that I realized what "it" was that we were missing. We had enough talent the last two years to make a run at nationals but the staff wasn't the same and we had inherited teams that had some real problems as far as discipline and dedication. Another year with either of those teams doing things our way and I think we could of been special. It is an on going project with most teams.


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SingleWingGoombah
(@singlewinggoombah)
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2nd try showed improvement!  But ended in failure.  I gave them 8 minutes, they had me stop the clock at 6 minutes and 22 seconds.  They made it up the R's correctly today, and their only mistake was the 2 players last named Ramirez had the first name starting with an I ahead of the first name starting with a D.  It was a gift wrapped mistake for me, now this drill had a great tie in with our constant discussion of doing the little things well! 

So their punishment was upped, but with absolutely no provoking from coaches, players finishing early were going back out and not just encouraging the kids taking longer, but were doing the exercise along side them. 

In terms of the drill itself, the 2 kids who started leading on Monday, really took charge on Tuesday.  I am going to give them 5 minutes today, and this should be the last day they have to do it.  The wrap up with them on it will be great. 


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gumby_in_co
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It's not the drill, but how you coach it. Sounds like you are coaching the hell out of this one. This is what I try to convey to coaches that laugh at "whose ball" when I run it. No offense to DP or anyone else who loves this drill, but it's a dumb drill. But if you have an objective or 3 and you put some thought and heart into it, it becomes a great drill. Not saying your drill is dumb at all, but I could see coaches and parents making fun of it. By the end of this, you'll have identified your leaders, taught them the value of attention to detail and built some "family". Got goosebumps reading about your faster guys going back to give moral support to the slower guys. THIS is what brings kids back year after year. They can't see not coming back to "their guys".

When in doot . . . glass and oot.


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SingleWingGoombah
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It's not the drill, but how you coach it. Sounds like you are coaching the hell out of this one. This is what I try to convey to coaches that laugh at "whose ball" when I run it. No offense to DP or anyone else who loves this drill, but it's a dumb drill. But if you have an objective or 3 and you put some thought and heart into it, it becomes a great drill. Not saying your drill is dumb at all, but I could see coaches and parents making fun of it. By the end of this, you'll have identified your leaders, taught them the value of attention to detail and built some "family". Got goosebumps reading about your faster guys going back to give moral support to the slower guys. THIS is what brings kids back year after year. They can't see not coming back to "their guys".

I run UBSW, so I am used to parents saying what I do is dumb, but I dont do anything that isnt value added to me. 

Day 3 was surprising, they failed, they had the 2 Ramirez kids not in order again.  I gave them 5.5 minutes today, they got lined up and helmets and water bottles sorted out quickly.  Once they realized they had it wrong, one of my rookies got down on the "ones at the end of the line" and before I even got to go into any discussion about the team failed, not the "ones at the end of the line" one of the players who had really upped his leadership since we started doing this drill, not one of the 2 older kids who had been stepping up as leaders since the beginning, but one of the younger kids on the team jumped in and pretty much told the kid what I would have about it was the team who failed.  We are a 9 and 10 year old team with 2 11 year old OBLs.  Only about 25% of the kids are 9 year olds, but one of my 9 year olds has found his voice from this, and has realized his leadership potential.  Again they faced punishment, and again, the ones who had already finished the drill, or were not in the group doing the ladder were going out and helping kids in, more than the day before.

I really hope that they get it today, because I cannot wait to discuss and wrap up the drill with them.  Day one they had 9 minutes and didnt finish, not even that close.  Day 4, they will have half that time, and should get it done.  But it is going to lead to a great lesson for them.  It has really helped our team come together, it has helped them learn how to communicate with each other, it has helped the natural leaders find their voice, it has given a great example of how not doing the little things right can lead to failure, it has forced them to work together to accomplish a task.  Took them a day longer than expected, but really strengthens the tie in to doing the little things right. 


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gumby_in_co
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Can't wait to read about the wrap up. I love this stuff more than the X's and O's and techniques.

When in doot . . . glass and oot.


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CoachDP
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No offense to DP or anyone else who loves this drill, but it's a dumb drill. But if you have an objective or 3 and you put some thought and heart into it, it becomes a great drill.

Agree.  The guys that don't get it say:  "So you just toss the ball out there and they fight over it?  Uh-huh."

Well, not entirely.  It's like anything else, if you can teach it well, it works.  If you can't teach it, it won't.

--Dave

"The Greater the Teacher, the More Powerful the Player."

The Mission Statement: "I want to show any young man that he is far tougher than he thinks, that he can accomplish more than what he dreamed and that his work ethic will take him wherever he wants to go."

#BattleReady newhope


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SingleWingGoombah
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Agree.  The guys that don't get it say:  "So you just toss the ball out there and they fight over it?  Uh-huh."

Well, not entirely.  It's like anything else, if you can teach it well, it works.  If you can't teach it, it won't.

--Dave

We coach that the ball is the most important thing to them, and we need it in our possession at all times.  If a kid is willing to fight his ass off for a minute just to get possession or maintain possession, well thats the type of attitude I want on my team.  The strain I saw in some kids faces as they started losing possession, the grunts and yells... the urgency they showed to get the ball back.  I loved the drill.  The way each kid progressed through each turn was great. 


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gumby_in_co
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We coach that the ball is the most important thing to them, and we need it in our possession at all times.  If a kid is willing to fight his ass off for a minute just to get possession or maintain possession, well thats the type of attitude I want on my team.  The strain I saw in some kids faces as they started losing possession, the grunts and yells... the urgency they showed to get the ball back.  I loved the drill.  The way each kid progressed through each turn was great.

The best drills have multiple teaching objectives.  If taught correctly, Whose ball develops:

Urgency to cause/recover loose footballs
Aggression - it's easier to keep the ball that take the ball
Intensity - Giving maximum effort for as long as it takes
Toughness - ignoring "boo boo's" to get the job done
Heart  - Not giving up
Conditioning - self explanatory

If you just toss them a ball for them to fight over it, you're teaching them to jump on loose footballs (yawn).

When in doot . . . glass and oot.


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SingleWingGoombah
(@singlewinggoombah)
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Topic starter  

The best drills have multiple teaching objectives.  If taught correctly, Whose ball develops:

Urgency to cause/recover loose footballs
Aggression - it's easier to keep the ball that take the ball
Intensity - Giving maximum effort for as long as it takes
Toughness - ignoring "boo boo's" to get the job done
Heart  - Not giving up
Conditioning - self explanatory

If you just toss them a ball for them to fight over it, you're teaching them to jump on loose footballs (yawn).

But still make sure to jump on the loose football too 🙂


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