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PSLCOACHROB
(@pslcoachrob)
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Great post Steve. I think sometimes many of us(certainly myself included) relax, forget, or just didn't/don't understand many of your points. One in particular is going to be a HUGE challenge for our staff next season. I'm very excited about what is happening around us currently.


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MHcoach
(@mhcoach)
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Topic starter  

One thing I would like to add.

Never ask a player to do something he can't do. While we constantly ask our players to push their limits, we never ask them to do the impossible. This applies to scheme & ability, you can't expect a player to do the unreasonable and then actually get upset when they don't.

Here's an example of what I mean:

Several years ago at the HS level we had an All American LB, he went on to a Big College & is still playing in the show today. Our DC at the time had a scheme where the Mike would check one way then cover the TE the other on boot. IMHO it was just physically impossible. Here was the best player we had ever seen at Mike & he couldn't do it. If he couldn't do it what were the chances Johnny 2 left feet could? It took over 1/2 a season of arguing, & only a call to a top college DC before we changed it. Silly it should have ever gotten that far.

When ever we work on things on grass, we always have an eye out for what actually works & what doesn't. This is where understanding the game comes into play. Remember you want your players to play fast, so only be as complex as they can be.

Joe

"Champions behave like champions before they're champions: they have a winning standard of performance before they are winners"Bill Walsh


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CoachCalande
(@www-coachcalande-com)
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One thing I would like to add.

Never ask a player to do something he can't do. While we constantly ask our players to push their limits, we never ask them to do the impossible. This applies to scheme & ability, you can't expect a player to do the unreasonable and then actually get upset when they don't.

Here's an example of what I mean:

Several years ago at the HS level we had an All American LB, he went on to a Big College & is still playing in the show today. Our DC at the time had a scheme where the Mike would check one way then cover the TE the other on boot. IMHO it was just physically impossible. Here was the best player we had ever seen at Mike & he couldn't do it. If he couldn't do it what were the chances Johnny 2 left feet could? It took over 1/2 a season of arguing, & only a call to a top college DC before we changed it. Silly it should have ever gotten that far.

When ever we work on things on grass, we always have an eye out for what actually works & what doesn't. This is where understanding the game comes into play. Remember you want your players to play fast, so only be as complex as they can be.

Joe

Joe,  Ill add this - the same applies to asking a coach what he cant do.  Instead, focus on what he can do and put him in a position to be successful as well.

MOJO    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gtcRmKnRcsA

Go to WWW.COACHCALANDE.COM  for Double Wing DVDs, Playbook, Drills Manuals, Practice footage and emagazines. Ask me about our new 38 special dvds!


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MHcoach
(@mhcoach)
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Topic starter  

Steve

I agree! I also think we have to ask coaches to work & get better. One of the things in putting together a staff is to blend what the coaches do & have a balance.

Joe

"Champions behave like champions before they're champions: they have a winning standard of performance before they are winners"Bill Walsh


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Dimson
(@dimson)
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Right now my biggest weakness as a coach is being able to work with coaches I don't agree with, especially if they are in charge.


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MHcoach
(@mhcoach)
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Topic starter  

Chris

That is always a problem, & it's one you have to learn to master. Early in my HS career I was horrible at it, often being down right destructive, I have learned better but it wasn't easy. I learned my ego was too big, & the need to be right doesn't always make things better. As I matured as a coach & a man I have learned to better handle such situations. Keep the team in focus, & coach.

Joe

"Champions behave like champions before they're champions: they have a winning standard of performance before they are winners"Bill Walsh


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CoachCalande
(@www-coachcalande-com)
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Right now my biggest weakness as a coach is being able to work with coaches I don't agree with, especially if they are in charge.

That is tough.

Its always got to be in your mind that your job is to ASSIST the header with his vision of things.  He may well ask for imput, suggestions, ideas but more than anything, and I stress this to my assistants constantly..its not ideas that I need.....its HELP with the ideas that are already in place!

MOJO    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gtcRmKnRcsA

Go to WWW.COACHCALANDE.COM  for Double Wing DVDs, Playbook, Drills Manuals, Practice footage and emagazines. Ask me about our new 38 special dvds!


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Dimson
(@dimson)
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I am not a shut up and color coach. I guess that is why I have rubbed some people the wrong way. I want to give input and not be told to shut up and color. I am not saying I want controll of scheme or anyting like that but if you put me in charge of a unit, I want to coach them and train them how I want to do it, with in the over all scheme of course. I am not going to teach shoulder blocking if we are a hands team or teach GOD if we are a Zone team, ect. But if I want to run the 3 cone drill or double bag drill or even who's ball, I want to be able to do it. I don't think I am asking a lot.


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Bob Goodman
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I attended our youth org's coaches meeting yesterday.  I asked each one of them what was the most important thing they learned this year(?)  All I got were vague generalities.

That might've been a result of the way the question was asked, or the tone set by the first to answer.

As for their season recaps, they said they were all happy with their seasons (I never was) and each of them thought they did well.

I wouldn't take remarks in a close-of-season meeting like that to reflect what's really on their mind.

For each loss, they had a ready excuse as to why things outside their control was responsible for their loss.  Everybody discussed their offense and defense.  Nobody discussed their special teams.

Probably because in most youth football, special team play hardly ever makes much difference.  It can make a difference if one team makes a point of onside kickoffs, but not if nobody does.

Sometimes a team may give up a lot of TDs or near TDs when they kick off, but that's usually not a result of failure to fill coverage lanes, but just a reflection generally of poor pursuit in open field situations.  The coach with that on his mind isn't going to raise it as a fault of special teams play per se, but just think of it as a problem with defense.


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Bob Goodman
(@bob-goodman)
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Keep track of who's who among the players.  It's not enough to note that somebody did well or poorly in a particular rep or play, and then after the next rep or play forget who that somebody was on the previous rep or play.  Ask their name if you don't know, even if they've told you 5 times already, and even if you have to miss watching the next rep to find out.  And if it's another coach who forgets who's who, don't complain about filling him in.


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mahonz
(@mahonz)
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Coaches have to work at coaching, that means you better be working when you are running drills. Constant correction & encouragement are needed. Be hard but fair, & push for perfection. Vince Lombardi always told his teams they would relentlessly pursue perfection. Not that they would be perfect since that was impossible, rather they would relentlessly pursue it.

Remember it is a game, if your team isn't having fun & enjoying it then something is wrong. Yes, winning is fun & losing sucks. Yes, hard work often isn't fun. There are ways to do this & still have a disciplined team.

Joe

Great list. I dont think this particular point gets touched on enough. Doing a good job coaching is exhausting.

Its why I always insist on having no practice sessions on Monday. That gives me 2 days off in a row to re-boot. It becomes too easy to burn out if you dont take care of yourself first.

What is beautiful, lives forever.


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PSLCOACHROB
(@pslcoachrob)
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Bob,
  Our staff has a gaudy record. Many of the games we have lost were due to special teams play. Many of the games we won against better talent were due to special teams play. We beat a team in 2008 that we were down by 18 points at half. Onside kicks got us back in that game. 2010 we lost a national championship game because the other team made one more extra point than we did. 2011 we almost lost in the nc game due to a punt return against us. We lost to the national champions this year in ot because we missed an extra point. I think the kicking game is by far the most under valued aspect of the game in youth ball. It is very easy to get better at it than your opponent as most opponents suck at specials. If you can punt in youth ball and have a solid defense you are very hard to beat. Many teams just go for it on 4th regardless of the situation.


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PSLCOACHROB
(@pslcoachrob)
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That is tough.

Its always got to be in your mind that your job is to ASSIST the header with his vision of things.  He may well ask for imput, suggestions, ideas but more than anything, and I stress this to my assistants constantly..its not ideas that I need.....its HELP with the ideas that are already in place!

Do you feel this is more of a problem at the youth level? I see it all the time. My header is very careful about who he has on his staff just for this reason. I see many staffs that are on completely different pages. I know it goes on at the hs level but I imagine that those guys buy in easier.


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jrk5150
(@jrk5150)
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and have a solid defense

But there's the key.

If you're ranking the importance, IMO special teams are not going to be near the top.  If you're not fundamentally sound elsewhere, ST's are not going to win you games by themselves, you need to get to where your O and D are at least comparable to your competition.  THEN you can use ST's to push you over the top.


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PSLCOACHROB
(@pslcoachrob)
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I certainly agree but bad specials can get you beat. We certainly don't have great specials but having at least decent specials can win you some games you wouldn't otherwise.


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